1. Lesson One of the Book of Daniel, Introduction to the Book of Daniel

The Necessity of Prayer Lesson XI,  Prayer and Trust

 

Before we continue with our lesson on Prayer and Trust I want to get a little technical with you regarding the meaning of words.  

There is sometimes confusion in the meaning of the word trust as used in the Old and New Testaments and before we continue lets try to bring some clarity about this word into our minds.  

The Old Testament was written in Hebrew and the New Testament was written in Greek. 

 

Every language has its own dictionary of words and there never are different languages where words match word for word. 

 

An Eskimo would naturally have a word for ice but go down into the South Seas several hundred years ago and ask the Polynesian for their word for ice and no doubt your question would be met with a confused look. 

 

Languages many times adopt foreign words as their own if they do not have such a word. 

 

In Japan they say hamburger and hot dog (with their own accent) and do not try to invent their own words for such items.

 

Some languages have words that can only be translated into another language by the use of several words to describe the action.

 

English words also have many meanings and because of that, cause confusion. 

 

One of those words is trust used in the Old Testament to describe fleeing for refuge. 

 

The Hebrew language has a word, in fact several different words that describe the action of fleeing for refuge. 

 

The English language does not have an exact word for that action but translators have used the word trust to describe that action. 

 

Fleeing for refuge has to do with a longing for a secure place so trust has to do with security.

 

I have not come across a Greek word that describes fleeing for refuge.

 

Words in any language develop due to the circumstances of the people of that language. 

 

Eskimos have ice, Polynesians dont.

 

The Hebrews dwelt in difficult circumstances and in walled cities. 

 

Refuge from enemies was always a prominent thing in their lives and perhaps this is why the Hebrew language has a word that describes this action. 

 

David in the Psalms compares the Lord to a fortress, a high tower, a refuge, a bulwark, a buckler, a rock, a strength.

 

David pictures God in military terms as a mighty warrior who will fight against them who fight against David. 

 

David asks God to Take hold of shield and buckler and stand up for mine help. 

 

Draw out also the spear.

 

Refuge was a necessary and prominent thing to the Hebrew and words to describe fleeing for refuge were natural to the language.

 

Perhaps refuge to the Greeks was not as prominent and no word developed for this action. 

 

As in many languages it can only be described by the use of many words.

 

The word trust in the Old Testament appears 107 times. 

 

The vast majority of its occurrence is due to its being translated from two Hebrew words and a few places especially in Job another two Hebrew words are used.

 

OLD TESTAMENT

 

1) khaw-saw'         A primitive root; to flee for protection (compare H982); figuratively to confide in:have hope, make refuge, (put) trust.

 

Ruth 2:12 ,  The LORD recompense thy work, and a full reward be given thee of the LORD God of Israel, under whose wings thou art come to trust. (khaw-saw)

 

2 Samuel 22:3,   The God of my rock; in him will I trust (khaw-saw): he is my shield, and the horn of my salvation, my high tower, and my refuge, my saviour; thou savest me from violence.

 

Psalm 36:7,  How excellent is thy lovingkindness, O God! therefore the children of men put their trust (khaw-saw) under the shadow of thy wings.

 

Nahum 1:7,  The LORD is good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust (khaw-saw) in him.

 

H2620

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chasah

khaw-saw'

A primitive root; to flee for protection (compare H982); figuratively to confide in:have hope, make refuge, (put) trust.

 

2) baw-takh'           A primitive root; properly to hie (proceed) for refuge (but not so precipitately as H2620); figuratively to trust, be confident or sure:be bold (confident, secure, sure), careless (one, woman), put confidence, (make to) hope, (put, make to)
trust.

 

Psalm 9:10 ,  And they that know thy name will put their trust (baw-takh) in thee: for thou, LORD, hast not forsaken them that seek thee.

 

Psalm 37:36,  Trust (baw-takh') in the LORD, and do good; so shalt thou dwell in the land, and verily thou shalt be fed.  Delight thyself also in the LORD; and he shall give thee the desires of thine heart.        Commit thy way unto the LORD; trust (baw-takh') also in him; and he shall bring it to pass.  And he shall bring forth thy righteousness as the light, and thy judgment as the noonday.

 

H982

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batach

baw-takh'

A primitive root; properly to hie (proceed) for refuge (but not so precipitately as H2620); figuratively to trust, be confident or sure:be bold (confident, secure, sure), careless (one, woman), put confidence, (make to) hope, (put, make to)
trust.

 

3) yaw-chal' A primitive root; to wait; by implication to be patient, hope:(cause to, have, make to) hope, be pained, stay, tarry, trust, wait.

 

 

Job 13:15 ,  Though he slay me, yet will I trust (yaw-chal) in him: but I will maintain mine own ways before him.

H3176

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yachal

yaw-chal' A primitive root; to wait; by implication to be patient, hope:(cause to, have, make to) hope, be pained, stay, tarry, trust, wait.

 

4) mib-tawkh'          From H982; properly a refuge, that is, (objectively) security, or (subjectively) assurance:confidence, hope, sure, trust.

 

 

Proverbs 22:19,  That thy trust (mib-tawkh) may be in the LORD, I have made known to thee this day, even to thee.

 

H4009

mibtach

mib-tawkh'

From H982; properly a refuge, that is, (objectively) security, or (subjectively) assurance:confidence, hope, sure, trust.